Building a better mouse trap

Today I received (not the first time) an email from Academia.edu. Apparently someone mentioned my name on a paper. This is their email:

Subject: A highly cited paper mentions the name “Borja Moya”
Dear Borja Moya,
A highly cited paper mentions the name “Borja Moya”.
View your mention [button]

And here’s where it gets funny. You get excited, click on the button and it gets you to a landing page, where you have to pay for a subscription in order to see the papers where someone cited you…
That’s Academia.edu’s mouse trap.
Selfish marketers screw this up all the time. I’m not picking on Academia.edu, there are many others doing the same (or worse) mouse traps.
Trust runs in short supply.
Creating a better mouse trap might look like a plan to hit short term goals, but people don’t care about those goals.
Good marketing is about respect, and like in any kind of relationship, trust is earned over time — with a high dose of care and respect for that person.
Building a better mouse trap might increase short term attention, but trust won’t follow. It never does.